LGBTQ

The Story of LGBTQ

What comes to mind when someone is described as “scum?” A lowlife. A criminal. A degenerate. That’s exactly what Big Tobacco thinks of people who identify as LGBTQ, even naming a marketing plan targeting the LGBTQ community in San Francisco “Project SCUM.”1

Tobacco companies were among the first to “support” LGBTQ communities—but they were never allies. They sought to demonstrate their allegiance by advertising in LGBTQ publications and sponsoring community and pride events. They exploit any feelings of isolation and despair this community experiences by promoting smoking as a way to bond with one another and relieve stress.2

Over the past 10 years, the smoking rate of LGBTQ populations has dropped by nearly half – the biggest drop of any group.3

But Big Tobacco doesn’t just sell cigarettes anymore – they’ve flooded the market with new tobacco products, such as e-cigarettes, to keep people addicted.  Unfortunately, the overall tobacco use rate for LGBTQ populations is still high at 24%.4

LGBTQ communities don’t need Big Tobacco to keep its pride.

  1. http://www.lung.org/assets/documents/research/lgbt-report.pdf
  2. http://www.lung.org/assets/documents/research/lgbt-report.pdf
  3. 2017 Story of Inequity, Indicator: Rate of change in prevalence of adult cigarette smoking by priority population group, 2007 to 2013-2014.
  4. 2017 Story of Inequity, Indicator: Prevalence of adult tobacco use by priority population group, including cigarettes, e-cigarettes and other tobacco products.

The Proof is in the Data

[ Data last updated 10/27/2020 ]

Indicator
LGBTQ
General Population
Adult Tobacco Use
1.Adult Cigarette Use: Adult cigarette smoking prevalenceLesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or TransgenderThe estimate is significantly higher than the California general population.18.0%10.7%
  • California Health Interview Survey, 2017-18. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.
2.Change in Adult Cigarette Use: Rate of change in adult cigarette smoking, 2014 to 2018Lesbian, Gay, or Bisexual-5.8%-13.7%
  • California Health Interview Survey, 2017-18. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.
  • California Health Interview Survey, 2013-14. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.
3.Adult Tobacco Use: Adult tobacco use prevalence (e.g. cigarettes, e-cigarettes and other vaping products, other tobacco products)Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or TransgenderThe estimate is significantly higher than the California general population.29.7%18.8%
  • California Health Interview Survey, 2018. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.
Youth Tobacco Use
4.Youth Cigarette Use: Youth cigarette smoking prevalenceThe estimate is significantly higher than the California general population.4.0%2.0%
  • California Student Tobacco Survey, 2017-18. San Diego, CA: Center for Research and Intervention in Tobacco Control, University of California, San Diego.
5.Youth Tobacco Use: Youth tobacco use prevalence (e.g. cigarettes, e-cigarettes and other vaping products, other tobacco products)The estimate is significantly higher than the California general population.15.0%12.7%
  • California Student Tobacco Survey, 2017-18. San Diego, CA: Center for Research and Intervention in Tobacco Control, University of California, San Diego.
Availability of Tobacco & Tobacco Industry Influence
6.Cheapest Cigarettes: Average price for the cheapest pack of cigarettes$7.19$7.11
  • Healthy Stores for a Healthy Community, 2019. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Public Health, California Tobacco Control Program.
  • American Community Survey, 2014-2018. Suitland, MD: U.S. Census Bureau.
7.Flavored Little Cigar Price: Average price for a single flavored little cigar/cigarillo$0.98$0.97
  • Healthy Stores for a Healthy Community, 2016. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Public Health, California Tobacco Control Program.
  • American Community Survey, 2011-2015. Suitland, MD: U.S. Census Bureau.
8.Tobacco Stores: Density of stores selling tobacco per 100,000 residentsThe estimate is 10.0 stores per 100,000 higher than the California general population.88.078.0
  • California Cigarette and Tobacco Products Retailer Licensees, May 2020. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Tax and Fee Administration.
  • American Community Survey, 2014-2018. Suitland, MD: U.S. Census Bureau.
  • Decennial Census, 2010. Suitland, MD: U.S. Census Bureau.
9.Flavored Tobacco: Proportion of stores that sell flavored non-cigarette tobacco products83.3%81.8%
  • Healthy Stores for a Healthy Community, 2019. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Public Health, California Tobacco Control Program.
  • American Community Survey, 2014-2018. Suitland, MD: U.S. Census Bureau.
10.Menthol Cigarettes: Proportion of stores that sell menthol cigarettes85.8%88.3%
  • Healthy Stores for a Healthy Community, 2019. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Public Health, California Tobacco Control Program.
  • American Community Survey, 2014-2018. Suitland, MD: U.S. Census Bureau.
11.Tobacco Advertising: Proportion of stores that keep 90% of their storefront free from any advertising42.8%40.1%
  • Healthy Stores for a Healthy Community, 2019. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Public Health, California Tobacco Control Program.
  • American Community Survey, 2014-2018. Suitland, MD: U.S. Census Bureau.
Cannabis Use
12.Adult Cannabis Use: Adult cannabis use prevalenceLesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or TransgenderThe estimate is significantly higher than the California general population.37.0%16.1%
  • California Health Interview Survey, 2017-18. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.
13.Youth Cannabis Use: Youth cannabis use prevalenceThe estimate is significantly higher than the California general population.20.6%14.7%
  • California Student Tobacco Survey, 2017-18. San Diego, CA: Center for Research and Intervention in Tobacco Control, University of California, San Diego.
Secondhand Smoke
14.Adult Secondhand Tobacco Exposure: Proportion of adults exposed to secondhand smokeLesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or TransgenderThe estimate is significantly higher than the California general population.67.8%52.9%
  • California Health Interview Survey, 2017-18. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.
15.Youth Secondhand Tobacco Exposure: Proportion of youth exposed to secondhand smoke or vapeThe estimate is significantly higher than the California general population.53.6%46.8%
  • California Health Interview Survey, 2018. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.
16.Smokefree Homes: Proportion of adults with smokefree homesLesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or TransgenderThe estimate is significantly lower than the California general population.78.5%88.0%
  • California Health Interview Survey, 2018. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.
Cessation
17.California Smokers' Helpline Enrollees: Proportion of California Smokers' Helpline enrolleesLesbian, Gay, or BisexualThe estimate is significantly lower than the population's make-up of California's adult smokers.6.7%10.9%of smokers are
LGBTQ
  • California Smokers' Helpline Caller Intake Reports, 2019. San Diego, CA: California Smokers' Helpline, University of California, San Diego.
18.Quitting: Proportion of smokers who tried quitting in the last 12 monthsLesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or Transgender55.9%56.2%
  • California Health Interview Survey, 2017-18. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.
19.Doctor Advice to Quit: Proportion of smokers whose doctors advised them to quitLesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or Transgender42.8%46.8%
  • California Health Interview Survey, 2017-18. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.

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A Story of Inequity

Tobacco's Impact on Health Disparities in California

For decades, the tobacco industry has aggressively targeted California’s diverse communities with predatory practices. Internal documents from Big Tobacco outline their strategies – many of which are shocking attempts to peddle deadly products by way of product discounts and manipulative advertising. They even gave away free products to youth in the past. These tactics masquerade as support for communities under the guise of cultural celebration.

Unfortunately, the tactics have worked. Big Tobacco aggressively targeted communities and, as a result, some populations have higher rates of tobacco use, experience greater secondhand smoke exposure at work and at home, and have higher rates of tobacco-related disease than the general population.1

Addressing tobacco-related health inequities is key to California’s efforts to fight tobacco, our state’s number one cause of preventable death and disease.2 Tobacco use, pricing, and its impact across California were analyzed where significant disparities were found across various populations. See how Big Tobacco affects each community in the Nation’s most diverse state.

A Story Of Inequity Methodology >

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Tobacco-Related Disparities
  2. Extinguishing the Tobacco Epidemic in California, April 11, 2017, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention