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August 22, 2019

E-cigarettes and vaping devices are getting a lot of attention, in particular for their rising popularity among youth. Growing research is showing these products are harmful and highly addictive. But there’s another dangerous part of e-cigarettes that deserves attention for the people around it – the ultrafine mist that users inhale and exhale while vaping, exposing themselves, bystanders and the environment to harmful materials. Despite what e-cigarette manufacturers would like us to believe around whether secondhand vapor is harmful, these products do NOT emit a harmless water vapor. It’s actually an aerosol with a mixture of dangerous chemicals. At least chemicals identified in e-cigarette aerosol are on California’s Proposition 65 list of carcinogens and reproductive toxins. According to the U.S. Surgeon General, the
e-cigarette aerosol could expose bystanders to harmful substances including:

  • nicotine
  • heavy metals
  • volatile organic compounds
  • ultrafine particles that can be inhaled deeply into the lungs

Exposure to fine and ultrafine particles may exacerbate respiratory ailments like asthma and are known to have an immediate negative impact on the cardiovascular system. E-cigarette use has also been shown to constrict arteries, which may cause a heart attack.

What’s more, research is showing that newer versions of
e-cigarettes and vaping devices produce more ultrafine particles compared to older models.

For parents of teens, be aware that the U.S. Surgeon General labels
e-cigarette use among youth as an epidemic. Teen e-cigarette use surged by 78% last year, with one in four high school students now using these products which contain nicotine, a highly addictive chemical. Even if your teen isn’t vaping, they may be breathing aerosol exhaled by someone else who is vaping, putting their health at risk.

Take steps now to breathe clean air. Adopt tobacco-free rules, including e-cigarettes, in your home and vehicle. Learn more about how to protect your family from e-cigarettes.

Tobacco control programs not only reduce smoking, but also reduce costs. In the past 20 years, California has saved $86 billion in health care costs due to fewer Californians using tobacco8.

Take steps now to breathe clean air. Adopt tobacco-free rules, including e-cigarettes, in your home and vehicle. Learn more about how to protect your family from e-cigarettes.

You Pay, Whether You
Smoke or Not

88% of African-American smokers use mentol cigarettes. For decades, Big Tobacco has marketed menthol cigaretttes to the African American community.

They Pay, Whether You
Smoke or Not

88% of African-American smokers use mentol cigarettes. For decades, Big Tobacco has marketed menthol cigaretttes to the African American community.

88% of African-American smokers use mentol cigarettes. For decades, Big Tobacco has marketed menthol cigaretttes to the African American community.

For parents of teens, be aware that the U.S. Surgeon General labels
e-cigarette use among youth as an epidemic. Teen e-cigarette use surged by 78% last year, with one in four high school students now using these products which contain nicotine, a highly addictive chemical. Even if your teen isn’t vaping, they may be breathing aerosol exhaled by someone else who is vaping, putting their health at risk.

Despite what e-cigarette manufacturers would like us to believe around whether secondhand vapor is harmful, these products do NOT emit a harmless water vapor. It’s actually an aerosol with a mixture of dangerous chemicals. At least chemicals identified in e-cigarette aerosol are on California’s Proposition 65 list of carcinogens and reproductive toxins. According to the U.S. Surgeon General, the
e-cigarette aerosol could expose bystanders to harmful substances including:

  • nicotine
  • heavy metals
  • volatile organic compounds
  • ultrafine particles that can be inhaled deeply into the lungs

Exposure to fine and ultrafine particles may exacerbate respiratory ailments like asthma and are known to have an immediate negative impact on the cardiovascular system. E-cigarette use has also been shown to constrict arteries, which may cause a heart attack.

References renameme

  1. U.S. Surgeon General. Surgeon General’s Advisory on E-cigarette Use Among Youth. e-cigarettes.surgeongeneral.gov. Published December 18, 2018. Accessed December 27, 2018.
  2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. E-Cigarette Use Among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2016.
  3. U.S. Surgeon General. Surgeon General’s Advisory on E-cigarette Use Among Youth. e-cigarettes.surgeongeneral.gov. Published December 18, 2018. Accessed December 27, 2018.
  4. U.S. Surgeon General. Surgeon General’s Advisory on E-cigarette Use Among Youth. e-cigarettes.surgeongeneral.gov. Published December 18, 2018. Accessed December 27, 2018.
  5. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. E-Cigarette Use Among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2016.
  6. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. E-Cigarette Use Among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2016.
  7. U.S. Surgeon General. Surgeon General’s Advisory on E-cigarette Use Among Youth. e-cigarettes.surgeongeneral.gov. Published December 18, 2018. Accessed December 27, 2018.
  8. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. E-Cigarette Use Among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2016.
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Dear Mayor Enter name here ,

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I am writing because I am concerned about the tobacco industry’s use of flavors in their toxic products to lure kids into lifelong addiction. The tobacco industry doesn’t stop at the use of flavors, it also uses kid-friendly packaging to deceive kids into thinking their products are harmless. This, coupled with unchecked online purchasing, gets tobacco products past parents and teachers and straight into the hands of kids. I ask for your leadership in addressing how we can keep our kids safe

I ask for your leadership in addressing how we can keep our kids safe from an industry determined to do them harm.

Sincerly,